Monthly Archives: February 2015

Review: The Angry Boater – Joel Sanders nitpicks his way through a new nautical solo show

Joel Sanders – Angry Boater

 

Joel Sanders is angry. This could be down to the fact his parents went against their Jewish-ness and sent him to a Christian school. Perhaps it’s due to his high blood pressure, which he makes a point of taking on stage. Or maybe it’s because living the life of Riley on London’s canalways isn’t as relaxing as the comedian thought it would be.

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Review: A View from the Bridge – Ivo van Hove’s moving and powerful production of Arthur Miller’s shattering drama

the view from the bridge 2015 © Jan Versweyveld

It’s hard to imagine a more powerful – or more iconoclastic – production of Arthur Miller’s shattering meditation on family relationships gone bad and immigrants trying to make good in 1950s New York. But director Ivo van Hove comes close.

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Artist Julian Hanford seeks crowdfunding to commemorate the Holocaust with six million domino tiles

FALL by Julian Hanford, art, coffin image

London-based artist Julian Hanford is planning to create an art installation composed of six million domino tiles to commemorate World War II and the 70 years that have passed since its end. The project, FALL, is estimated to cost £1.58m and Hanford is looking to you, the public, for help.

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JR at Jewish Book Week: Robin Renwick discusses the subject of his latest book, anti-apartheid campaigner Helen Suzman

Helen Suzman, from JR issue V14-2

This coming Tuesday 24 February Jewish Renaissance‘s editor Rebecca Taylor will be hosting a special event as part of Jewish Book Week. Taking place at London Jewish Museum, the afternoon will centre around the South African anti-apartheid campaigner Helen Suzman (pictured above visiting Meadowlands high school, Soweto in 1977).

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In pictures: A sneak peak at London Jewish Museum’s wedding retrospective For Richer For Poorer

For Richer For Poorer exhib, Jewish Museum, Press 2015

Miriam Solomons married American GI soldier Al Friedman in June 1945. Some 70,000 British women married GI soldiers during the war.

The London Jewish Museum’s new exhibition is glorious and beautifully put together. For Richer For Poorer delicately weaves artefacts and archives from the museum’s collections with delightful personal material donated or lent by members of the public to tell the story of Jewish marriage throughout the years. Including Jewish immigration and life, with its aspirations and tribulations, its joys and challenges over the years and even centuries. The dresses are gorgeous, the menus mouth-watering – and challenging in the huge number of courses on offer – and the photographs and personally written experiences extraordinarily moving. Anyone who’s partial to shedding a tear at weddings should take a packet of tissues!

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JR’s Rebecca Taylor talks Tehran, Shmita and the fall of the Berlin Wall with Jon Kaye on Sunday Jewish Radio

This week Jewish Renaissance editor Rebecca Taylor spoke to Jon Kaye at Sunday Jewish Radio. The station, which is based at Jewish Care in Golders Green, London, broadcasts interviews and conversations on a range of topics and airs – you guessed it – on Sundays! Rebecca told Jon about why she left mainstream journalism for a Jewish magazine and talked about her own Jewish identity, as well as some of the stories in the current issue of JR. Such as Jewish Tehran, why Shmita is becoming a hip commandment, and what has happened to the German Jewish community since the fall of the Berlin wall. You can listen to the interview above.

To find out more about Sunday Jewish Radio, visit their website.

Review: Judi Herman discovers drama and comedy on a women’s cancer ward in Anat Gov’s Happy Ending

Happy Ending (3) - c Piers Foley_press2015

Entering a space equipped with hospital beds and drip-stands, you’d be forgiven for thinking you were in an operating theatre, rather than the kind with lights, action and music. But then Happy Ending is a play about women facing up to life with The Big C; cancer.

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